THE END OF GOD

embodiment is the end of god's path

The Cross of Reality: A Personal Review — January 10, 2016

The Cross of Reality: A Personal Review

9781451488807h.jpgGaylon Barker’s book about the theology of the cross in Bonhoeffer “The Cross of Reality: Luther’s Theologia Crucis and Bonhoeffer’s Christology” deserves the highest praise. Although, I have to admit, it’s also been a pain in the ass until I read it. That is to say, this book was published at the very moment that I did my innovative discovery of the theology of the cross being the guiding motif in all of Bonhoeffer’s work. Continue reading

“Christopraxis” – A Review — January 5, 2016

“Christopraxis” – A Review

51RVn-JI19L._SY344_BO1,204,203,200_.jpgAs a theologian researching the theology of the cross (theologia crucis) in Bonhoeffer, it was time for me to read Andy Root’s “Christopraxis, A Practical Theology of the Cross.” I’m not a practical theologian. Not by profession, that is. I do think of myself of a systematic theologian who is deeply interested in the practical, and transformational power of theology. But practical and systematic theology are two different disciplines that, though intersecting, have their own, method and rationality. In this review, then, I will not discuss the contribution of Root to the field of practical theology, simply because I’m not qualified to do so. I will, however, look at the integration of the theologia crucis into his discipline. Continue reading

“Longing for Running Water”: A Short Review — September 3, 2015

“Longing for Running Water”: A Short Review

573095I enjoyed reading Ivone Gebara’s “Longing for Running Water.” This book advocates and explains the position of ecofeminism from a Latin American perspective. The main point of the book is that an entirely new way of thinking and doing theology is urgently needed in the face of the ecological destruction of our planet. The close connection between feminism and ecology consists in the fact that the concerns of both disciplines arise from the rampant effects of patriarchal thought patterns and behavior on both women and the ecosystem. If the patriarchy has been opposed to the well-being and flourishing of women, it is outright destructive for the earth. Ecofeminism proposes a radical new way of thinking, not as a mere alternative to established practices, but, because of the urgency of the matter, as the only possible way to overcome the ecological disaster that is looming. Continue reading

“Mapping Modern Theology”: A Review — July 30, 2015

“Mapping Modern Theology”: A Review

Mapping Modern TheologyMapping Modern Theology is a fun book. I provides a different take on theology as it developed after the Enlightenment. Typically one will read a historical overview that takes the reader from movement to movement whereby differences and similarities between movements are highlighted. Another common approach consists of monographs that explicate the inner coherence and workings of a particular systematic theology. Continue reading

Review of “Race Matters” by Cornel West — July 10, 2015

Review of “Race Matters” by Cornel West

512lQebfcDL._SX320_BO1,204,203,200_As a foreign student in the United States my entry into the racism debate is recent. I had a psychological conversion 4 years ago when, through the experience of a black class mate, I became aware of my participation in white privilege even though I am not an American citizen. I have come to realize that the litmus test for any worldview or ethics, and especially any expression of Christian spirituality, is its stance on racism in the US and its willingness to make it the prime focus of action and reflection. Racism is not just one of the many issues the US is facing. It points to THE moral flaw of the US at its core and thus its challenge.

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Review of “The Future of Evangelical Theology” by Amos Yong —

Review of “The Future of Evangelical Theology” by Amos Yong

UnknownFrom the title “The Future of Evangelical Theology. Soundings from the Asian American Diaspora” it is evident that Amos Yong is seeking a renewal of Evangelical Theology. If this would be the sole purpose of the book his attempt would be partially successful and partially unsuccessful at providing the impetus for momentum. Reading the book, however, it becomes quite clear that Yong has a secondary aim. This is also evidenced in the subtitle. He seeks to call his fellow Asian American Evangelical theologians to retrieve their own Asian distinctiveness and locate it at the heart of their theologizing endeavor within an Evangelical context. Yong sets himself to this task with great persuasion and effectiveness.

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Demythologization or Remythologization? — April 3, 2015

Demythologization or Remythologization?

Rudolf BultmannA little shout-out here to Rudolf Bultmann on the occasion of Easter. This theologian deserves much more attention. The bad rap he gets for his project of demythologization (if he is mentioned at all in conservative circles) is entirely unjustified. I’ve just been reading his “New Testament & Mythology and Other Basic Writings” and can only say that, while I don’t subscribe to Bultmann’s demythologization, I’m deeply impressed.

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Bonhoeffer’s Black Jesus: A Review — December 26, 2014
Towards a Theology for a Secular Age — November 17, 2013

Towards a Theology for a Secular Age

Some Implications of Charles Taylor’s ‘A Secular Age’ for Theology

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As one friend commented, Taylor’s book ‘A Secular Age’ is magisterial. It commands respect; it is an authoritative voice in the discussion on where we come from and equips and invites us to participate in the conversation of where we are headed or should be heading. Living between whence and whither we do well to heed Taylor’s wisdom and insight. Continue reading